"Fruit is definitely on the maintenance diet. It's on the lifestyle diet."

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Apricots


Apricots originally came from China. This golden fruit has been around for more than 4,000 years. Apricots progressively made their way through the Persian Empire to the Mediterranean where they were fondly adopted. Spanish explorers introduced the apricot to the New World, and they were planted in the gardens of Spanish missions all over California. The first recorded major production of apricots in America was in 1792 south of San Francisco

Apricot kernels contain an average of 21% proteins and 52% vegetable oils, and are widely used as a substitute of almonds in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Apricot seeds, because of their remarkably high content of amygdalin, are a source of vitamin B17 and utilized in alternative medicine for cancer therapy. It has to be underlined, however, that the seeds must be baked prior to direct consumption, since apricot kernels can be poisonous if ingested raw in large quantities. Aside from the potential anti-cancer properties of apricot seeds, the fruit itself is a small natural drug-store as well.

Apricot is a fruit that has been known to humans for thousands of years. During archeological excavations in the antique Armenian town Shenchovit near Yerevan, apricot pits were found in layers dating back to over 6000 B.C. The first written mention of apricot, however, is in a Chinese letter more than 4000 years old.


Scientific Name for Apricot:

Prunus Armeniaca

The apricot has highly health-building virtues. The fresh fruit is rich in easily-digestible natural sugars, vitamins A and C, riboflavin (B2) and niacin (B3).Its shape is similar to that of the peach but slightly smaller, with skin that is velvety and golden orange in color.



Nutrition Information of Apricot

Principle

Nutrient Value

Percentage of RDA

Energy

50 Kcal

2.5%

Carbohydrates

11 g

8.5%

Protein

1.4 g

2.5%

Total Fat

0.4 g

1%

Cholesterol

0 mg

0%

Dietary Fiber

2 g

5%

Vitamins

Folates

9 µg

2%

Niacin

0.600 mg

4%

Pantothenic acid

0.240 mg

5%

Pyridoxine

0.054 mg

5%

Riboflavin

0.040 mg

3%

Thiamin

0.030 mg

2.5%

Vitamin A

1926 IU

64%

Vitamin C

10 mg

16%

Vitamin E

0 mg

0%

Vitamin K

3.3 µg

3%

Electrolytes

Sodium

1 mg

0%

Potassium

259 mg

5.5%

Minerals

Calcium

13 mg

1.3%

Copper

Iron

0.39 mg

5%

Magnesium

10 mg

2.5%

Manganese

0.077 mg

3%

Phosphorus

23 mg

3%

Zinc

0.2 mg

2%



Most fresh apricots are marketed in June and July, but a limited supply of imported apricots is available in large cities during December and January. Domestic apricots are grown principally in California, Washington, and Utah.

Apricots develop their flavor and sweetness on the tree, and should be mature but firm at the time that they are picked.

Look for: Apricots that are plump and juicy looking, with a uniform, golden-orange color. Ripe apricots will yield to gentle pressure on the skin.

Avoid: Dull-looking, soft, or mushy fruit, and very firm, pale yellow, or greenish-yellow fruit. These indicate overmaturity or immaturity, respectively.

Apricots Infographic




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